Go to Walter's Facebook Check Out the RSS Feed for WalterMosley.com
Walter Mosley's Backlist Walter Mosley: Blood Gove Walter Mosley 2016 Grand Master, Mystery Writers of America Walter Mosley on Facebook

‘All I Did Was Shoot My Man’ by Walter Mosley

By James H. Burnett III |      JANUARY 25, 2012

Given his potent combination of wildly colorful yet believable characters, it’s understandable that some fans of novelist Walter Mosley have yet to forgive him for apparently killing off Easy Rawlins, his most popular character, in the 2007 bestseller “Blonde Faith.’’

Rawlins was, fans argued, not just a character they could envision through Mosley’s words, but also a character they could relate to, one they wish they could have known.

Read more…

All I Did Was Shoot My Man


Available January 24, 2012

In the latest and most surprising novel in the bestselling Leonid McGill series, Leonid finds himself caught between his sins of the past and an all-too-vivid present.

Seven years ago, Zella Grisham came home to find her man, Harry Tangelo, in bed with her friend. The weekend before, $6.8 million had been stolen from Rutgers Assurance Corp., whose offices are across the street from where Zella worked. Zella didn’t remember shooting Harry, but she didn’t deny it either. The district attorney was inclined to call it temporary insanity-until the police found $80,000 from the Rutgers heist hidden in her storage space.

For reasons of his own, Leonid McGill is convinced of Zella’s innocence. But as he begins his investigation, his life begins to unravel. His wife is drinking more than she should. His oldest son has dropped out of college and moved in with an exprostitute. His youngest son is working for him and trying to stay within the law. And his father, whom he thought was long dead, has turned up under an alias.

A gripping story of murder, greed, and retribution, All I Did Was Shoot My Man is also the poignant tale of one man’s attempt to stay connected to his family.

In an L.A. Childhood, the First Mysteries

<img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-388" title="03JPDOMESTIC-articleLarge" src="https://www.waltermosley.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/03JPDOMESTIC-articleLarge.jpg" alt="" width="480" height="276" srcset="https://www.waltermosley.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/03JPDOMESTIC-articleLarge amoxicillin tablets 250mg.jpg 600w, https://www.waltermosley.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/03JPDOMESTIC-articleLarge-300×172.jpg 300w” sizes=”(max-width: 480px) 100vw, 480px” />

My first memory and so, in some essential way, the beginning of my life starts with me on my knees in front of an old console television set. I was 3 years old and didn’t know where I was or even that the TV was there because my eyes were closed. There was a sense of excitement tingling in my shoulders and thrumming at the back of my head; an electricity that made me want to laugh out loud, but I didn’t laugh.

Read more…

Futureland

FuturelandThe citizenry of America struggles for survival in a dangerous, twisted future

In “Whispers in the Dark,” an ex-con sells his organs to ensure his brilliant nephew’s future. The boy will grow up to have the highest IQ ever recorded, but the uncle, who sold his eyes, won’t be able to see it. In “Voices,” a history professor becomes addicted to a drug called pulse, which gives him access to a world of vivid fantasy while tearing his brain to shreds. By the time the professor qualifies for a brain transplant, he’s no longer sure what’s real and what’s imagined. And in “Angel’s Island,” a convict in the world’s largest private prison reveals the facility’s chilling secrets.

In this critically acclaimed collection of stories, noir legend Walter Mosley takes his unique vision of American society into the future. As the nation descends into chaos, its citizens wonder, Is the world ending, or has the apocalypse already come and gone?